Thursday, November 12, 2009

Think(ing) Green Thursday


Our friend Michelle is once again hosting Think(ing) Green Thursday for us, and I hope that many of you will consider joining us.

I have been in love with the sea ever since I was a child, and read Elizabeth Enright's "The Sea Is All Around". I have lived near the sea for the past fifty-three years, and would never wish it otherwise. I'm sure we are all aware of how dire the situation is these days for the waters that comprise such a large share of our planet.

I am turning once again to Sea Notes, the blog of Monterey Bay Aquarium in California, for my post today.

Along with so many important considerations that President Obama is undertaking these days, is an Ocean Policy Taskforce. He would like to create a National Ocean Agenda and Policy for United States oceans. Obviously, to accomplish anything in this direction, we need cooperation and collaboration of other nations. For instance, Cuba and Mexico must cooperate with the United States in order to restore health and oversee the declining populations of sharks and sea turtles, and design a management plan, in the Gulf of Mexico. It is hoped that our efforts will inspire cooperation in this direction all around the world.

Also, on November 3rd, Sea Notes reported in an article titled "In Over Our Heads", about an on-going program which interested me very much. It seems that there is also climate change in the sea and that what we do far above, affects what goes on among the sea animals down on the ocean floor. This may be hard for us to imagine, but it is true.

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) has recently reported that food supplies to 60% of the ocean floor are affected by the amount of carbon captured and held there. MBARI employs a robot they call the Benthic Rover (see picture) programmed to travel along the ocean floor to measure the impact of climate change below the surface.

I am one of so many of us who often grumble about modern technology. But I find this sort of thing truly amazing, and am so grateful that there are people out there using this technology to help restore the health of our environment - land, sea and air.


All pictures in this post from Monterey Bay Aquarium

9 comments:

Singing Bear said...

The sea is so mysterious and magical. If only we could find a way to protect it and the creatures who live there. Let's hope humans wake up before it's too late.

Peace.

bobbie said...

Singing Bear, I am so happy to hear from you again! You've been away too long!

Christine Gram said...

We miss our Aquarium so much. What a wonderful resource of education. Thank you for mentioning the National Ocean Agenda and Policy... I'd like to learn more about what they are proposing.

Daryl said...

As always you provide a wake up call that is much needed

I love the addition of the puzzle to your side bar!

Deborah Godin said...

I've seen a number of documentaries (including Al gore's) on nature, the sea and our global climate. I think a case could be made that it's every bit as crucial as the rain forest. possibly moreso.

Lily Hydrangea said...

I hope Obama can do something (with everything else he has to do)!
I often think I couldn't live far from the sea as well. The ocean is definitely a deciding factor as to why I stay here on LI!

Dianne said...

I really love the sea turtles :)

I hope the aquarium continue its work

Autumn Belle @ KDP said...

The sea is such a beautiful world, it is good to know that there are people who cares about it.

Mountain Photog said...

Great post, Bobbie! I never thought about carbon affecting the oceans like that. Interesting! I still avoid eating live caught shrimp after watching a documentary on the Sea of Cortez. . .